RSS

Moocs are free – but for how much longer?

21 Aug

Monetising career development courses could be the next step for the university, says Stanford professor

By Chris Parr

Few institutions are as closely associated with the massive open online course movement as Stanford University. But could monetising Moocs, particularly in professional development courses, be the next step for the California-based institution?

Two of the best-known US Mooc platforms, Coursera and Udacity, were formed by Stanford professors, and the university’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley places it in close proximity to many of the world’s leading tech companies.

John Mitchell is vice-provost for online learning and overseer of Stanford’s Mooc programme, which has delivered more than 240 online and blended campus courses to about 2 million people since 2011 – more than 50 of them for free.

“Moocs have started out as a free opportunity – and free is a great way to get people interested,” he said. “But traditionally, students in the US pay tuition to go to college or university and I don’t think it is unreasonable to ask people to pay a little bit for education activities that help them to move forward in their careers.” Professor Mitchell, who is an instructor on a computer security Mooc offered by Stanford on the Coursera platform, said that professional development courses offered universities the best opportunity to grow the income they generate from online courses.

“I think [Stanford] will have low cost, high volume, but non-free courses online that will help make our online programmes sustainable,” he said, adding that no college or university was able to continue funding free courses without finding a way to cover the costs.

[ Full article available at Times Higher Education: http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/moocs-are-free-but-for-how-much-longer/2015204.article ]

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 21, 2014 in MOOCs in the News

 

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: